Tag Archives: encryption

Encryptability vs Folder Guard: which one to choose?


Encryptability

Attack-proof encrypted containers

Encryptability protects your data by creating encrypted containers. When you move a file into such a container, it is encrypted with the AES algorithm, giving it the strongest protection known at this time. When you enter the password to unlock the container, it appears as a Virtual Encrypted Disk, with its own drive letter. When a program needs to open a file stored in the container, the file is decrypted on the fly.
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Folder Guard

Access control without encryption

Folder Guard restricts access to folders and files dynamically, without encrypting them. When a program attempts to open a file or a folder, Folder Guard intercepts the request and checks whether the request is allowed according to the rules set by the administrator. If necessary, it asks the user to enter the correct password before allowing the request to open the folder to go through.
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Which security software is right for you?

Absolute protection of data

If you require your files to be available only to you no matter what, then only the strong encryption provides such protection, so the choice is clear: Encryptability. There currently is no usable method of breaking the AES encryption (and no one anticipates that such a method could be developed any time soon.) With Folder Guard, on the other hand, the files are protected only on your computer, where Folder Guard is installed and enabled. If someone has a physical access to your computer and has sufficient expertise, they could remove the hard drive or disable Folder Guard software and bypass the restrictions. In contrast, removing the hard drive protected with Encryptability or disabling the Encryptability software does NOT remove the protection of the files. The only way to access the encrypted files is by providing the correct password, period.

Instant password protection

If you need quick results and easy reconfiguration of the protection settings, then Folder Guard would be the tool of choice. With Folder Guard, you don't need to go through the lengthy process of creating and configuring an encrypted container. Just select the folder you want to password protect, specify the password, and it's protected instantly.

Password protection of individual folders

With Encryptability you create just one password to protect all files and folders you put into an encrypted container. (However, if you create several encrypted containers, each container can have its own password.) On the other hand, with Folder Guard you can assign a separate password to each folder, and you can even create several different passwords, with different access rights, assigned to the same folder. This way, if you want a user only to view the files but not modify them, you give such a user the "read-only" password. If you trust another user to not only view but also modify the files, you give that user the "full access" password.

Fine-tune the restrictions

Encryptability offers the "all or nothing" protection: after the correct password is provided, all encrypted files and folders within that container become available. Folder Guard, on the other hand, lets you fine-tune the protection settings based on many factors. You can allow only certain programs to access the protected files, while denying such access to others. Or, you can configure the restrictions differently for different user accounts. If you need such flexibility, choose Folder Guard.

Write-protected or full access

Both Encryptability and Folder Guard offer you an option to write-protect the files they control. You may find such an option useful when, for example, you want the files to be available for viewing or printing, but protected from accidental or intentional modification or destruction. The difference is, with Folder Guard it's you, the administrator, who creates the rules and Folder Guard enforces such rules on other users. With Encryptability, it's the end user (most probably you, but could be someone else who knows the password), who selects the option to write-protect the files and folders at the time when the password is entered to unlock the encrypted container.

Stop downloading programs from the Internet

If you want to add security to your files by preventing users from downloading and running programs from the Internet, then Folder Guard offers you a way to set up such restrictions. (Encryptability does not offer such a functionality.)

Prevent running programs from the external drives

Bad guys know that social engineering attacks are of the most sure ways to get behind the firewalls and security software. If you want to be rather safe than sorry, then you can use Folder Guard to stop running programs from the external drives. (Encryptability does not offer such a functionality.)

Prevent copying files to removable drives

One common way of stealing company files is by copying them to the removable drives (such as flash thumb drives). If you want to protect your files from that, you could use Folder Guard to set up the read-only access to the removable drives. This way, people would be able to read files from the external drives, but copying new files back to them would be restricted. (Encryptability does not offer such a functionality.)

So, which one to choose?

It's all up to you and your specific requirements. If you are not sure, you are welcome to download both Encryptability and Folder Guard and give them a try. They both come with a built-in license for a free use during the first 30 days. If you like one of them better, purchase a license online, and use Windows Settings to uninstall the one you don't want. (No hard feelings!)

Happy computing!

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Encryptability: Compare Personal and Business Licenses

Encrypt and password-protect files with Encryptability Encrypt and password-protect files with Encryptability encryption software for Windows 11,10,8.

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We offer two kinds of licenses for the continued use of Encryptability: personal and business.

The personal license is available for purchase at a discount, and it entitles you to use Encryptability for the home, personal use only. For example, you can use Encryptability under the personal license to create Virtual Encrypted Disks to keep your personal files: documents, photos, videos, tax returns, financial records, and so on.

However, if you use Encryptability to encrypt any files related to your business or employment, you must purchase the business license.

The functionality of Encryptability under the personal or business license is the same, except that when Encryptability is registered with a business license, it gives you additional choices of the encryption algorithms:

Algorithm available with: Encryptability personal licenseEncryptability business license
AES-128YesYes
AES-256YesYes
Twofish-128 Yes
Twofish-256 Yes
AES-Twofish-512 Yes
XTS modeYesYes
CBC mode Yes

AES-128 stands for Advanced Encryption Standard  with 128-bit key, and AES-256 selects the same AES algorithm but with the 256-bit key.

Encrypt and password-protect files with Encryptability Encrypt and password-protect files with Encryptability encryption software for Windows 11,10,8.

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Twofish-128 stands for Twofish  algorithm with a 128-bit encryption key, and Twofish-256 means Twofish encryption with a 256-bit key. Finally, the choice of AES-Twofish-512 gives you the cascade encryption  algorithm that is a combination of AES-256 and TF-256 with the effective key length of 512 bit.

The XTS encryption mode  is considered the best choice at the time of this writing. Business customers can also select the CBC mode  which is an older standard that has some deficiencies, but may be required for compliance with some requirements you might have.

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USBCrypt updated to v.14.6

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from $49.95

User rating: User rating 4.7/5

USBCrypt is compatible with Windows 10 USBCrypt is compatible with Windows 11




Try USBCrypt free:
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June 5, 2014.

A new version 14.6 of USBCrypt software is available now for download and purchase!

This is a maintenance release that includes several improvements and fixes, such as:

  • A problem has been corrected that caused Windows to display an error message when using the System Image backup program of Windows even though no Virtual Encrypted Disks have been started.
  • Several other minor improvements have been made.

As usual, the trial version of USBCrypt comes with a free license for 30 days of full use. If you have not tried it yet, please feel free to download it and give it a try.

And, of course, if you have purchased your USBCrypt within the last 12 months, you can upgrade to this version free of charge (for the earlier purchasers the 50% upgrade discount is also available.)

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Migrating encrypted data from TrueCrypt to USBCrypt

If you've been using the popular encryption software TrueCrypt, you are probably aware that its anonymous development team had announced recently that they are discontinuing the development of TrueCrypt, and advising its users to migrate their encrypted files to other software solutions. While it's not entirely clear which "unfixed security issues" the developers refer to in their announcement, it's probably a good idea to start looking for an alternative to TrueCrypt.

Encrypt and password-protect external drives with USBCrypt Encrypt and password-protect external drives with USBCrypt encryption software for Windows 11,10,8.

User rating: User rating 4.7/5

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If you've used TrueCrypt to encrypt an external drive, then our USBCrypt is an obvious choice: we've designed it specifically to make the encryption of the external drives easy and straightforward. (And yes, it's as secure as it can be.)

Special offer for the TrueCrypt users migrating to USBCrypt:

SAVE 50% NOW

If you've got a new external drive where you want to move your data from a TrueCrypt volume, the procedure is quite simple: all you need to do is use USBCrypt software to create a new empty Virtual Encrypted Disk on the external drive, then mount the TrueCrypt volume and use Windows Explorer (or any other file manager you like) to copy the files from the TrueCrypt volume to the Virtual Encrypted Disk created with USBCrypt. After the copying is all done, the data have been migrated! You can now delete the TrueCrypt volume and use that external drive for other purposes.

What if you don't have another external drive and want to convert the same drive from TrueCrypt to USBCrypt? That's not a problem, too: you surely have a backup of the data in some other place, right? Or, if this is a backup drive, then you have the master copy of the files on your computer, correct? So in such a case, first make sure the second copy (the master or the backup) of the data is in good condition and up-to-date, and then just format the external drive, use USBCrypt to create a fresh new Virtual Encrypted Disk on it, and then copy the files from the master or from the backup onto the encrypted disk using Windows Explorer or another file manager.

Happy computing!

Special offer for the TrueCrypt users migrating to USBCrypt: SAVE 50% NOW

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USBCrypt updated to v.10.9

We’ve just released yet another update to our encryption product USBCrypt. This is a maintenance release that includes several fixes and improvements, such as:

  • In some usage scenarios, the Optimize for performance option could cause 100% of the available RAM to be consumed. We have corrected that.
  • When encrypting a drive, the size of the Virtual Encrypted Disk can now be selected using units other than MB.
  • The size of the Virtual Encrypted Disk is now displayed when choosing the Properties command from the taskbar icon right-click menu.

If you are already using a previous version of USBCrypt, you don’t need to remove it: just download and run the new version, and it should update the previous version while keeping your settings and customizations intact.

Happy encrypting!

Using names and labels to organize USBCrypt drives

Encrypt and password-protect external drives with USBCrypt Encrypt and password-protect external drives with USBCrypt encryption software for Windows 11,10,8.

User rating: User rating 4.7/5

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If you use USBCrypt to protect just one or two drives, it’s easy to keep track of them. However, when the number of the encrypted drives grows, it becomes more difficult to keep them organized. The fact that each physical drive can be represented by two drive letters (one for the host drive and another one for the Virtual Encrypted Disk it contains) does not make it any easier. To help you manage the encrypted drives, USBCrypt offers you the options of assigning names to them. There are several names used by USBCrypt and Windows in different places of their user interfaces. Let us discuss them in detail.

When you encrypt a drive for the first time, USBCrypt asks you to choose two names: the Virtual Encrypted Disk name and the Host Disk name:

Choosing the encrypted drive name

The first name (for the Virtual Encrypted Disk) is used when displaying the windows and menus of USBCrypt. For example, it is shown on the USBCrypt window when starting the encrypted disk:

Starting a Virtual Encrypted Disk

This name is also displayed on the USBCrypt “balloon” notifications:

An Encrypted Disk has been attached

Or, when you right-click on a USBCrypt taskbar icon, you can see the name of Virtual Encrypted Disk on the menu:

The Virtual Encrypted Disk menu

As you can see, by using different names with different Virtual Encrypted Disk, you can make it easier to recognize them in Windows.

What about the second name you are asked to enter when encrypting a drive, the Host Disk name? This name is displayed by Windows as a label next to the host disk:

The Host Disk label

You can change the default name “USBCrypt Host Disk” to something more descriptive. Keep in mind, however, than both the Host Disk and Virtual Encrypted Disk names are NOT encrypted: they can be seen even before you enter the password to start the encrypted drive.

What if later on you’ve decided that other names would describe your encrypted drive better? You can change both the Virtual Encrypted Disk and Host Disk names by clicking on the Tools button on the Start Virtual Encrypted Disk window:

Changing the Virtual Encrypted Disk and Host Disk names

If you change the Virtual Encrypted Disk name, it takes effect immediately. However, if you change the Host Disk name, you may need to restart the computer before Windows would recognize the new name.

Besides the Virtual Encrypted Disk and Host Disk names, there is a third name that Windows uses to refer to the Virtual Encrypted Disks you create: it’s the labels it shows next to the Virtual Encrypted Disks in the Explorer windows:

Virtual Encrypted Disk label

Encrypt and password-protect external drives with USBCrypt Encrypt and password-protect external drives with USBCrypt encryption software for Windows 11,10,8.

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The default text for the label is “Virtual Encrypted Disk” if you have chosen the NTFS file system for it, or just “ENCRYPTED” if you have formatted it with the FAT file system (because FAT limits the number and kind of characters that can be used in a drive label). USBCrypt itself does not provide a command to change such a label, because Windows itself offers it: you can change the label of an encrypted drive in the same way as of any other drive: by right-clicking on the drive and choosing Properties from the menu:

Changing the Virtual Encrypted Disk label

Enter the desired name there, and the label will change. Unlike the Virtual Encrypted Disk and the Host Disk names we’ve discussed above, the Virtual Encrypted Disk label is encrypted, along with all other data the encrypted disk contains: this label is only displayed by Windows after you’ve entered the correct password to start the encrypted disk.

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USBCrypt 10.8 is out!

We are excited to announce that a new version 10.8 of our encryption software USBCrypt has been just released and is available now!

This version includes many improvements and fixes, such as:

  • An option to select the preferred optimization of the Virtual Encrypted Disks: you can now choose whether to optimize for performance or for quick removal of the encrypted disks.
  • An option to launch the "autorun" process "As Admininstrator" when starting or stopping the encrypted disks.
  • You can now create custom names for the host disks (other than the default USBCrypt Host disk), to make it easier to recognize different disks in the Explorer windows.
  • While the encryption process of a drive is in progress, you can now minimize the USBCrypt window to the taskbar. You may find it handly when encrypting large drives.
  • Also, you can now pause and resume the encryption process, if you need to temporarily allow other programs to use the full CPU power fo your computer.
  • The built-in backup software that comes with Windows 7 or Windows Vista can now recognize the Virtual Encrypted Disks as valid backup destinations for the documents and settings.
  • USBCrypt now warns you if you log off or shut down the computer while a disk is being encrypted.
  • And more! Please give the new USBCrypt a try.