Tag Archives: usbcrypt

USBCrypt v.16.10 released

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Personal license $49.95
Business license $99.95

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October 25, 2016.

A new version 16.10 of USBCrypt software is available now for download and purchase!

This update enables the use of USBCrypt on clean installations of Windows 10 build 1607 and Windows Server 2016 with Secure Boot enabled.

As usual, the trial version of USBCrypt comes with a free license for 30 days of full use. If you have not tried it yet, please feel free to download it and give it a try.

And, of course, if you have purchased your USBCrypt within the last 12 months, you can upgrade to this version free of charge (for the earlier purchasers the 50% upgrade discount is also available.)

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USBCrypt 16.6 released

Buy USBCrypt:
Personal license $49.95
Business license $99.95

Try USBCrypt free:
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June 15, 2016.

A new version 16.6 of USBCrypt software is available now for download and purchase!

This update offers several improvements and fixes.

As usual, the trial version of USBCrypt comes with a free license for 30 days of full use. If you have not tried it yet, please feel free to download it and give it a try.

And, of course, if you have purchased your USBCrypt within the last 12 months, you can upgrade to this version free of charge (for the earlier purchasers the 50% upgrade discount is also available.)

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USBCrypt 15.4 released

Buy USBCrypt:
Personal license $49.95
Business license $99.95

Try USBCrypt free:
Download free trial

April 12, 2015.

A new version 15.4 of USBCrypt software is available now for download and purchase!

This update includes several improvements and fixes, such as:

  • Full support for the exFAT file system, on those versions of Windows that offer exFAT support.
  • A new command, PANIC, has been added to the USBCrypt notification icon menu that you could use to quickly stop all encrypted drives, even if they have open files on them.
  • When creating a new Virtual Encrypted Disk, the name you have chosen for the disk is now used as the drive label of the Virtual Encrypted Disk.
  • A new Group Policy has been added to the Administrator's Kit that enables the administrator to hide the license key information on the About USBCrypt window.
  • The look of the main window of USBCrypt has been changed to give the 'flat' appearance.
  • Several other minor improvements have been made.

As usual, the trial version of USBCrypt comes with a free license for 30 days of full use. If you have not tried it yet, please feel free to download it and give it a try.

And, of course, if you have purchased your USBCrypt within the last 12 months, you can upgrade to this version free of charge (for the earlier purchasers the 50% upgrade discount is also available.)

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USBCrypt updated to v.14.6

Buy USBCrypt:
Personal license $49.95
Business license $99.95

Try USBCrypt free:
Download free trial

June 5, 2014.

A new version 14.6 of USBCrypt software is available now for download and purchase!

This is a maintenance release that includes several improvements and fixes, such as:

  • A problem has been corrected that caused Windows to display an error message when using the System Image backup program of Windows even though no Virtual Encrypted Disks have been started.
  • Several other minor improvements have been made.

As usual, the trial version of USBCrypt comes with a free license for 30 days of full use. If you have not tried it yet, please feel free to download it and give it a try.

And, of course, if you have purchased your USBCrypt within the last 12 months, you can upgrade to this version free of charge (for the earlier purchasers the 50% upgrade discount is also available.)

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Migrating encrypted data from TrueCrypt to USBCrypt

If you've been using the popular encryption software TrueCrypt, you are probably aware that its anonymous development team had announced recently that they are discontinuing the development of TrueCrypt, and advising its users to migrate their encrypted files to other software solutions. While it's not entirely clear which "unfixed security issues" the developers refer to in their announcement, it's probably a good idea to start looking for an alternative to TrueCrypt.

Encrypt and password-protect external drives with USBCrypt software for Windows 10,8,7, and XP.
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If you've used TrueCrypt to encrypt an external drive, then our USBCrypt is an obvious choice: we've designed it specifically to make the encryption of the external drives easy and straightforward. (And yes, it's as secure as it can be.)

Special offer for the TrueCrypt users migrating to USBCrypt:

SAVE 50% NOW

If you've got a new external drive where you want to move your data from a TrueCrypt volume, the procedure is quite simple: all you need to do is use USBCrypt software to create a new empty Virtual Encrypted Disk on the external drive, then mount the TrueCrypt volume and use Windows Explorer (or any other file manager you like) to copy the files from the TrueCrypt volume to the Virtual Encrypted Disk created with USBCrypt. After the copying is all done, the data have been migrated! You can now delete the TrueCrypt volume and use that external drive for other purposes.

What if you don't have another external drive and want to convert the same drive from TrueCrypt to USBCrypt? That's not a problem, too: you surely have a backup of the data in some other place, right? Or, if this is a backup drive, then you have the master copy of the files on your computer, correct? So in such a case, first make sure the second copy (the master or the backup) of the data is in good condition and up-to-date, and then just format the external drive, use USBCrypt to create a fresh new Virtual Encrypted Disk on it, and then copy the files from the master or from the backup onto the encrypted disk using Windows Explorer or another file manager.

Happy computing!

Special offer for the TrueCrypt users migrating to USBCrypt: SAVE 50% NOW

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USBCrypt 13.11 certified for Windows 8.1

Buy USBCrypt:
Personal license $49.95
Business license $99.95

Try USBCrypt free:
Download free trial

A new version 13.11 of USBCrypt software is available now for download and purchase! This version was submitted to the Windows 8.1 Application Certification and we are happy to report that it passed the tests and is now officially compatible with Windows 8.1.

What's new in version 13.11:

  • A new format for the Virtual Encrypted Disks that allows for encrypting drives as large as 128 TB (tera-bytes).
  • An option to skip encrypting the empty space of the drive, that dramatically increases the speed of the initial drive encryption. For example, while the previous version could take several hours to encrypt a large drive, now the same process takes less than a minute!
  • When stopping a Virtual Encrypted Disk that is still in use, you can now see which processes still have the files open on that disk, and stop or even terminate them directly.
  • If the host disk encounters an error while reading or writing the encrypted data, USBCrypt now notifies you immediately, by displaying a popup "balloon" in the taskbar notification area.
  • Many other improvements "under the hood", that make USBCrypt even faster and more reliable than before.

As usual, the trial version of USBCrypt comes with a free license for 30 days of full use. If you have not tried it yet, please feel free to download it and give it a try.

And, of course, if you have purchased your USBCrypt within the last 12 months, you can upgrade to this version free of charge (for the earlier purchasers the 50% upgrade discount is also available.)

Why can’t I copy large files over 4GB to my USB flash drive or SD card?

Encrypt and password-protect external drives with USBCrypt software for Windows 10,8,7, and XP.
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The capacity of your external flash drive or SD card is large: 8GB, 16GB, or more. There is enough free space on the drive. You can copy the smaller files to the external drive just fine. Yet, when you attempt to copy a large file (4GB or larger) to the external drive, Windows gives you an error (such as: There is not enough free space on the drive, or similar.) Does this sound familiar?

If you experience such a problem, most probably it’s caused by the fact that your external drive or card is formatted with the FAT32 file system. This type of a file system has a built-in limitation on the size of the files that it may contain. Although the total size of the files that you can copy to a FAT32 drive could be as large as 2TB (or the physical capacity of the drive, whichever is smaller), the size of each individual file may not exceed 4GB.

This limitation may sound silly: why would anyone design a system that would not allow for the larger files? The problem is, when the FAT32 file system was designed (that was back in the days of Windows 95), no one anticipated that we would have such large files in use today. Or, maybe the designers hoped that by the time such large files become common, the use of the FAT32 system would be replaced by the more modern systems.

In any case, how to solve the problem of copying the 4GB files? Easy: you need to replace the FAT32 file system on the drive with a more modern one, such as NTFS or exFAT. These newer file systems not have the 4GB file size limitation! Scroll down this page for the instructions on how to change the file system.

Which file system is better, NTFS or exFAT?

They both a pretty good, but which one to choose depends on how else you are going to use the external drive or SD card.

The NTFS file system is supported by all modern versions of Windows (including such dinosaurs as Windows XP, Windows 2000, and Windows NT), and it also supports many other functions not supported by FAT32: file security, encryption, compression, etc. However, if you plan to use the external drive with non-Windows devices (such as an Android tablet or a Mac computer), it would not be recognized by such devices out of the box, and you would need to install additional software or tweak their settings quite a bit to make them work with the NTFS drives.

The exFAT system is not as advanced as NTFS, but it has more support on the non-Windows platforms. For example, many Android phones and tablets, as well as the recent versions of macOS support exFAT devices pretty well.

How to change the drive from FAT32 to NTFS or exFAT format?

Let’s show how to it for NTFS first. There are several ways to go. If the drive or card is empty or contains no important files of yours, the easiest way is to use the Windows Format command to format the drive with the NTFS file system. Specifically:

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1. Attach the external flash drive to the computer, wait for Windows to recognize it and assign a new drive letter to it.

2. Open the Computer folder and locate the drive letter assigned to the flash drive you want to format with NTFS (in the example below, it’s drive F:)

3. Before continuing, open the drive in a window and make sure it’s empty or does not contain any important files, because after you format a drive, all information that was on it will be erased! If there are files on the drive that you want to keep, take this opportunity to copy them over to the hard drive or some other drive.

4. If you are sure that the external drive contains no important files of yours, go back to the Computer folder, and right click on the icon of the external drive:

Windows offers the Format command on the shortcut menu
(Click to enlarge)

5. Select Format from the menu, and then choose the formatting options:

Options for formatting the external drive with NTFS file system

6. Make sure to select NTFS in the File System drop-down list. That’s what determines the kind of a file system that the drive should have. Also, you may want to select the Quick Format option, which should speed up the formatting process quite considerably.

7. Press Start, and Windows should warn you once again about erasing any existing information on the drive (see step 3 above). Again, if you are sure the drive does not contain any irreplaceable documents, confirm that you want to proceed with the formatting:

Windows warns you about erasing the existing files during the drive formatting

8. If you’ve selected the Quick format option, the formatting should take no longer than a minute or two.

As a result, you should have the same drive, but now it should have the NTFS files system on it. Now you should be able to copy the files larger than 4GB to the drive just fine.

In addition to formatting a drive with the NTFS file system, Windows also offers a way to convert a FAT32 drive to NTFS. The difference is that the conversion process would keep the existing files on the drive. See Windows Help and Support of your computer for the instructions on how to do the conversion.

What if I want to use exFAT instead of NTFS?

The steps to change to exFAT are the same as for NTFS, you only need to select exFAT in the dropdown box instead of NTFS.

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P.S. Our encryption software USBCrypt can create a NTFS- or exFAT-formatted Virtual Encrypted Disk even if the host drive is formatted with FAT32. This suggests yet another solution: instead of formatting the host disk with NTFS, you can instead use USBCrypt to create a NTFS-formatted Virtual Encrypted Disk. If you do that, then in addition to breaking the 4GB file size barrier, you would also get the strong security and password protection for files you put inside of the Virtual Encrypted Disk. See the USBCrypt web page for more information or to download a free 30-day trial.

P.P.S. If you only need to transfer a large file from one computer to another, you can get by with the FAT format if you use a file splitter utility, like the one included in our file manager AB Commander. Using its Split command, you can split a large file into smaller chunks (say, 2GB each). Such chunks can be put on a FAT-formatted drive without a problem. Then, on the destination computer, use the Merge command to combine the chunks together into the original file. Of course, if you want to open the file directly from the external FAT drive, this won’t help you, but just to transfer the file between Windows computers should work fine.

P.P.P.S. Here is what to do if Windows does not offer the NTFS format option.

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Test the strength of your password with USBCrypt

Encrypt and password-protect external drives with USBCrypt software for Windows 10,8,7, and XP.
User rating: 4.7/5
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When using USBCrypt to password protect drives, you have probably wondered, how difficult would it be for someone to just try all possible character combinations and discover the correct password that way? If someone were to write a program to automate the process of simulating the password entry, how fast would it take to discover the correct password?

Well, you may be surprised to learn that there is no need to write a special program for that, because USBCrypt already includes such a command out of the box! It’s easy to try it: just try starting an encrypted drive, as usual, but instead of entering the password, click on the Tools button and select the Recover Password item on the menu:

USBCrypt comes with a command to recover the password by using the brute force

On the next screen, select the character set you want to try. You can select the minimum and maximum length of the passwords to try, and also choose between the lower-case or upper-case characters, digits, special characters, or any combination of them:

The settings for the Recover Password command of USBCrypt

When you press the Start button, USBCrypt starts to try the passwords from the character set you’ve selected, in turn, until it finds one that unlocks the encrypted drive. It displays the progress in a separate window, that also shows the estimated time to complete the enumeration of all possible passwords:

The progress of the Recover Password command of USBCrypt

If you’ve selected a very simple password, it can be discovered rather quickly, and the result is displayed right away:

The successful result of the Recover Password command of USBCrypt

What about the more complex passwords? The time to try them all grows rapidly as the length of the password or its complexity increases. Here are a few numbers, obtained on a computer with a mid-range (as of the time of this writing) Intel i5-650 CPU:

Characters/Maximum lengthUp to 3Up to 5Up to 7
Lowercase30 minutes15 days28 years
Lowercase + Uppercase4 hours1 year35 hundred years
Lowercase + Uppercase + digits7 hours3 years12 thousand years
Lowercase + Uppercase + digits + all special characters1 day 26 years240 thousand years

(You may get different numbers, depending on the CPU your computer has.)

Encrypt and password-protect external drives with USBCrypt software for Windows 10,8,7, and XP.
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As you can see, by choosing a password that’s complex enough, you can protect your secrets with USBCrypt pretty well. On the flip side, take care to remember your password, because if you forget it, it would be practically impossible to recover it (unless you have created a spare key file with USBCrypt, of course.

Happy encrypting!

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Personal vs business license for USBCrypt

Encrypt and password-protect external drives with USBCrypt software for Windows 10,8,7, and XP.
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We offer two kinds of licenses for the continued use of USBCrypt: personal and business.

The personal license is available for purchase at a discount, and it entitles you to use USBCrypt for the home, personal use only. For example, you can use USBCrypt under the personal license to encrypt drives that you use to store your personal files: documents, photos, videos, tax returns, financial records, and so on.

However, if you use USBCrypt to encrypt any files related to your business or employment, you must purchase the business license. For example, if in addition to your personal files you also use your encrypted drives to transport files between your office and home, you must purchase a business license.

The functionality of USBCrypt under the personal or business license is the same, except that when USBCrypt is registered with a business license, it gives you additional choices of the encryption algorithms:

Algorithm available with: USBCrypt personal licenseUSBCrypt business license
AES-128YesYes
AES-256YesYes
Twofish-128 Yes
Twofish-256 Yes
AES-Twofish-512 Yes
XTS modeYesYes
CBC mode Yes

AES-128 stands for Advanced Encryption Standard  with 128-bit key, and AES-256 selects the same AES algorithm but with the 256-bit key.

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Twofish-128 stands for Twofish  algorithm with a 128-bit encryption key, and Twofish-256 means Twofish encryption with a 256-bit key. Finally, the choice of AES-Twofish-512 gives you the cascade encryption  algorithm that is a combination of AES-256 and TF-256 with the effective key length of 512 bit.

The XTS encryption mode  is considered the best choice at the time of this writing. Business customers can also select the CBC mode  which is an older standard that has some deficiencies, but may be required for compliance with some requirements you might have.

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Can USBCrypt encrypt the C: drive?

Although the primary function of USBCrypt is to protect the external and removable drives from unauthorized access, it’s possible to encrypt the main system C: drive with it as well. Yes, you can use USBCrypt software to create a Virtual Encrypted Disk hosted on the C: drive, and use it to store your sensitive files and folders in the Virtual Encrypted Disk. The only difference when using the C: drive as the host for the Virtual Encrypted Disk is that the C: drive is always plugged in to the computer.

If you want to create a Virtual Encrypted Disk on the C: drive, the only thing you need to do when running USBCrypt is enable the “Include the system drive in the list” option:

The option to include the system drive in the USBCrypt list

After that, you can proceed as usual: select the desired size for the Virtual Encrypted Disk, the encryption algorithm, the password and so on. Before starting, however, it’s a good idea to create a full backup of your system drive, to be able to start over if something goes not as expected.

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When deciding on the size of the Virtual Encrypted Disk to create, do not make it take all available free space: leave plenty of room on the host disk for use by Windows.

After the Virtual Encrypted Disk has been created, you can start it as usual (it will have a separate drive letter, other than C:), and move the files and documents you want to be private to the encrypted drive. Be careful NOT TO MOVE the Windows folder and other folders you might see on the C: drive (such as Program Files, ProgramData, Documents and Settings, Users, etc.) These are system folders that must remain where they are, or Windows may start doing weird things. Only move the files and documents that need to be protected, leave everything else where it is.

Happy encrypting!

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